Attention Customers! We will be closed on Friday, August 5th for the day (Open on Saturday, August 6th)

Native Pollinator Seed Mix - Satinflower Nurseries x Pollinator Partnership Canada

RSS
Native Pollinator Seed Mix - Satinflower Nurseries x Pollinator Partnership Canada

Satinflower Nurseries and Pollinator Partnership Canada have teamed up to create a Native Plant Pollinator Seed Mix, with $2 from each purchase being donated to support pollinator habitats.

Click here to purchase yours today!

Why native plants for pollinators?

Many types of plants can help support pollinators– if they have flowers, they may be providing pollen and nectar to pollinators, like bees (native and honey bees), flower flies, butterflies, moths, beetles, and more. Or they may provide food for butterflies and moths (the caterpillars are butterfly babies and need to eat plants). Plants that have evolved with the amazing diversity of native bees, butterflies, and other pollinators in our area, are the best for supporting a diversity of pollinators and they benefit other local wildlife too. Here are some reasons to choose native plants when you garden:

  • Reason 1
  • Reason 2
  • Reason 3

About this mix:

The plant species in this mix are listed below. All of the plants in this seed blend are native to the mid to lower half of Vancouver Island and the Gulf Islands and support native pollinators. The seeds are produced at Satinflower Nurseries from field-grown native plants (not collected from the wild). They are grown without herbicides, pesticides (including neonicotinoids), and chemical fertilizers.

[map of where they can be planted]

The plants are a mix of annual plants (grow for one year and regenerate in following years by seed) and perennial plants (retain above ground vegetation all year or die back above ground, with plants regenerating in following years from roots, rhizomes, or bulbs, and seeds). The species in this mix love the usual fall-winter-spring rains and dry summers that we get in our region. They will do best in well-drained soil, and will not need addition of water in the summer when sown in fall. You can provide supplemental water to encourage a longer growing season and bloom time, but too much water can cause overgrowth of some species and also encourage growth of non-native plants.


This year (2022) we have created two seed pack designs, one showing a native cedar hairstreak butterfly on Spring Gold, and the other featuring an orchard mason bee on Sea Blush. Enjoy your seeds, the beautiful flowers that they beget, and all of nature. Thanks for doing your part! 

Species included:

We could link here to a photo gallery of the plants in the blend. Sort of like this only the flowering images of the different species. We could include cotyledon pics too so people can recognize their sprouts. 


Your purchase helps pollinators beyond the seeds in the pack!

[Info about where donation funds are going]


Questions or comments about the seed packs? contact...


Planting instructions: [placeholder stuff here, Kristen, please edit/add]:

Sow in fall, full sun (a bit of shade is fine), in weed-free, well-drained soil. Seeds should be evenly spread over 1-2m2 of soil, with good seed to soil contact. Good seed to soil contact means that there is little live or dead vegetation in the sown area, so that the seeds are in direct contact with soil. There is no need to 'bury' the seeds (this can reduce germination), sowing over the soil is best. You can do a light racking of the soil after you have sown the seeds. 


Your seeds have been pre-blended with vermiculite which helps to spread seed evenly over the soil. If you would like to thin your seed out more, sand works well.


If sown in fall, no watering is required (yay native plants!). These plants are adapted to our climate and will germinate with the fall, winter, and spring rains. 

If sown in the winter or early spring, they likely will not need water, but some of the species may not germinate until the following fall or winter.

We do not recommend sowing the seed mix in the late spring or any time in the summer. 


What to expect:

A beautiful mix of native plants that flower from spring into fall, lots of types of solitary native bees (they don’t want to sting you), bumble bees (they too would rather just forage on plants and ignore you), butterflies (so many types here! Vancouver Island Butterflies Book – Satinflower Nurseries), flower flies (they try to trick you by looking like bees– but they can’t sting, they help pollinate, and control pests), moths (the underappreciated butterfly relatives; let’s show them some love), beetles (the original pollinators), and so much more!


The annual plants in this mix will germinate (produce leaves/stems) soon after they are sown in the fall and will bloom that spring. 

Some of the perennial plants in this mix will germinate in the fall and others in the spring. Some will bloom the first year and some won’t bloom until the second year, providing wonderful, natural, year to year changes in your space.

 Latin name:

Sowing time:

Germination time:

Achillea millefolium

Fall and early spring

Fall and spring

Allium cernuum

Fall

Spring

Cerastium arvense

Fall and early spring

Fall and spring

Clarkia amoena

Fall and early spring

Fall and spring

Eriophyllum lanatum

Fall and early spring

Fall and spring

Lomatium nudicaule

Fall

Spring

Lomatium utriculatum

Fall and early spring

Fall and spring

Koeleria macrantha

Fall and early spring

Fall and spring

Plectritis congesta

Fall and early spring

Fall and spring

Solidago lepida

Fall and early spring

Fall and spring

Symphyotrichum chilense

Fall and early spring

Fall and spring



Tips:

For the seeds of the annuals to create new plants in your space after the first year, they need to fall on bare soil. So, you may want to clear some dead vegetation to make room for the seeds to have bare soil. You can collect the seeds when they are ready and sow them yourself if you want, back into the original plot or to new areas. 


Perennials will spread by yearly growth and underground rhizomes. But you can collect the seeds from your perennials too and help them move to new places in your yard or share with neighbours and friends.

Once mature, perennials can also be thinned if they start to get a little too enthusiastic and crowd out some of the more delicate species. Thinning perennials can also keep your annuals thriving (require some bare soil to re-seed year-to-year). Perennials can be divided (dig up a section, roots included) in early fall and planted in new locations. Watch for fall-germinating seedlings in your meadow (like Sea Blush and Farewell-to-spring) if there has been some rain .


Like brushing your teeth, native plantings require regular care to keep looking their best. Weed out invading plants whenever you have time (use this as an excuse to break from desk work!), but at least 4 times over a year, visit the area and take a few minutes to pull non-native plants. Non-native plants can compromise meadow diversity and balance.

Something about deadheading/cutting back– what aesthetic they want

Purchases for retail:

Are you a business on Vancouver Island or the Gulf Islands and want to provide your customers with a native seed mix to help pollinators and other wildlife? We have bulk pricing available, contact [or something like this]

  • Satinflower Nurseries